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Battle Sisters

There is a full step by step painting guide for these miniatures here.

I haven’t got much history with Sisters of Battle, since their second edition codex was released just after I’d drifted away from the hobby, and by the time I came back they had been unsupported for so long that they weren’t really relevant. For that reason I wasn’t particularly interested when the news broke that they were to be re imagined in plastic. But it just goes to show that you should never be closed minded, because now the Adeptus Sororitas are here and I absolutely love them!

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These miniatures are from the multi part battle sisters kit that Joe Tomaszewski designed (with I would imagine significant input from project lead Martin Footit and design manager Ben Jefferson). Joe has outdone himself with this kit – it’s simply fantastic! So many options, fantastic poses, beautifully rendered cloth… the list goes on and on.

The only slight negative for me about the sisters is that the 6 official orders don’t have the widest range of colour schemes – it’s very much variations on white, red and black. So I decided to invent my own order and be totally revolutionary by throwing purple into the mix.

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I’ve gone for a fairly standard ‘Eavy Metal style of painting on these because I didn’t want to spend forever on them, and I’m happy with the result considering the time spent. On the superior I tried out a different skin tone to my usual recipes, which I think turned out ok, and of course I couldn’t resist a bit of non metallic metal on the sword blade.

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Of course, now I’m being severely tempted by the Triumph of Saint Catherine (which should probably be referred to as the Triumph of Mr Footit). I don’t think I can commit the time it deserves to it though – maybe in the next lifetime!

 

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Howling Banshee Exarch

When I left Games Workshop I was surprised and overwhelmed by the generosity of Gaku Matsubayashi, who gave me a copy of Jes Goodwin’s Eldar sketchbook as a leaving gift. Of course, I had to do something to try and repay such generosity, so I painted the Howling Banshee Exarch as a gift for Gaku (he sculpted the excellent plastic banshees kit).

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I wanted to try a different colour scheme, and settled on the classic combination of magenta/purple and teal, despite some misgivings about it being a bit too Slaaneshy. I decided to retain the pale armour, but moved away from the bone into warm grey (I used pallid wych flesh shaded with skavenblight dinge). I didn’t want to make this look super reflective and shiny (I imagined more of a plastic, super advanced lightweight material), so I just shaded towards the recesses and in one or two other areas to add some visual interest, and edge highlighted with white.

I decided to try something different to the classic Eldar crystalline sword, so I used more of a conventional non metallic metal approach, but introduced more teal towards the body of the miniature to try and guide the eye inwards. The small details are painted with true metallic paints, which I always find add an extra level of contrast when viewing the miniature in the hand (but unfortunately doesn’t translate so well to photos).

I don’t want to criticise the ‘Eavy Metal team, who I think do wonderful work (to tight deadlines). But I do think that they sometimes have a tendency to go too far with the shading on female faces, with the result that to me they often look quite masculine. I’ve gone for a more subtle approach here, which is much more to my taste. Fortunately Gaku has sculpted some lovely big, well defined eyes so I was able to paint the irises without too much difficulty!

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I also painted one of the optional exarch helmets to see how it would look, but in the end preferred the unhelmeted version, so that was the one I glued in place before giving the miniature to Gaku.

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Best leaving gift ever – thank you Gaku-san!
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Drazhar (again)

On my first day in the Games Workshop miniatures design studio I was thrilled to be shown to my desk alongside the mighty Darren Latham. Once I’d recovered sufficiently from this excitement I was delighted to find that he was in the process of sculpting a new version of Drazhar (with plenty of input from the legendary Jes Goodwin of course).

Long time readers of my blog may remember that I tried my hand at sculpting my own version of Drazhar before I joined GW, based on some codex artwork. Although I was quite pleased with it at the time, looking back on this piece now it’s quite obvious that I got the proportions wrong, among various other deficiencies. So I was really pleased to get my hands on the fantastic new version. It’s a lovely kit, goes together really nicely, and can be almost fully assembled before painting (I think I painted the head separately).

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I wanted to revisit the green armour I used previously, so I went with a similar colour scheme to my previous version. For the armour I used incubi darkness, kabalite green and sybarite green, mixing white into the final highlights and shading the deepest recesses with a mix of naggaroth night and black. Rather than using gold I went with silver non metallic metal, and the spot colour was moot green.

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I’m afraid there won’t be a painting tutorial for this miniature as I didn’t take many photos during the painting process but I’m pleased to say that my Etsy shop is now open again and there will be some new guides coming soon!

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Sister Amalia Novena

Just a quick update to demonstrate that this blog hasn’t totally died and to share pictures of Sister Amalia Novena, the vanguard of the new range of Sisters of Battle that are coming soon.

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One of the perks of working in the studio is that I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a copy directly from the man that sculpted her (the legendary Darren Latham) several months before she hit the shelves. The miniature is based on Karl Kopinski’s iconic artwork, and I think it’s safe to say that Daz did an excellent job of translating the artwork to miniature.

Painting-wise I really wasn’t pushing myself here – I just wanted a nice relaxing project that I could paint without it taking very long. I decided to call my version Alexis before I knew what the official name was going to be, so that’s the reason for that being painted on the bolter! Anyway, I don’t feel I fully did the miniature justice but happily I do have another copy that I’d like to paint in a different colour scheme at some point in the future.

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Primaris Space Marine Captain

Update: There’s now a full painting guide for this miniature available here.

Due to my own idiocy I didn’t think I would be able to attend Warhammer Fest until a few weeks before it took place. Consequently I hadn’t given much thought to an entry, but when I realised that I had got my dates wrong it was clear that I needed to get my skates on and finish the space marine I was painting!

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Although on the face of it this is yet another boring shiny space marine, I did try out a new effect by adding the small purple reflections to the armour. I’d decided to paint the plasma pistol glow in colours I remember from when I worked with real plasma in a previous life, so the idea behind the reflections was that there would be other plasma weaponry being discharged in the area. This allowed me to get a little more purple into the piece.

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The captain was designed by the legend that is Darren Latham, and as with all of his kits the attention to detail and the way it goes together is exquisite. It’s a great miniature for practicing freehand with the cape and all those little shields! My purity seal text can be a bit hit or miss but I was fairly pleased with the result this time. And in another of my trademarks I added some subtle texture to the inside of the cape.

As a staff member I was restricted to entering the Open competition at Golden Demon. I was delighted to get the gold, but at the same time I did feel a bit disappointed in myself for what I think has ended up as quite an unimaginative entry! I really want to push myself out of my comfort zone for next year so I need to get thinking!

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Eldar Autarch

A full painting tutorial for this miniature is available here.

The plastic Autarch has been around for several years now and although I’ve always thought it was fantastic I’ve somehow never got round to painting it! I decided to put that right and paint up a version in Alaitoc colours, using the box art from the old finecast version as inspiration.

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I chose to paint this miniature in more of an ‘Eavy Metal style than I often do, by which I mean edge highlighting and recess shading rather than trying to apply large area highlights. Working in the studio and seeing the amazing work that the team do first hand almost certainly influenced this choice!

Since I’m not currently able to produce full tutorials I’ve been doing my best to share step by step images and recipes on instagram, so follow me there if that’s something that would interest you! (My handle is nicholas.gareth)

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Eisenhorn

It has been nearly six months since I last updated the blog, so it’s definitely overdue! A few people have contacted me to ask whether I’m still in the land of the living and I’m happy to say that I definitely am! I started a new job as a trainee Citadel Miniatures designer in July, and the subsequent upheaval left me with greatly reduced time for painting. But I’m happy to finally have a new project to show off: Inquisitor Eisenhorn!

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The miniature was a gift from Maxime Corbeil, who is the very talented gentleman that sculpted Eisenhorn (and also a fantastic painter in his own right). I love the Eavy Metal version of this miniature painted by Aiden Daly, but I wanted to do something a little different. Fortunately Maxime had the clever suggestion of using the original 54 mm paint job from the Inquisitor game as inspiration (reproduced here without permission).

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I made a few tweaks to adapt the colour scheme to the smaller scale, but I’ve tried to stick fairly close to the original and I’m quite pleased with the final result.

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Now that things are starting to settle down a bit I’m hoping to get more time for painting, so it shouldn’t be quite so long before the next update!

Unfortunately I can’t produce any more pdf tutorials at the moment, but I am starting to share more step by step stuff on my instagram feed (nicholas,gareth), so feel free to follow me there!

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Morathi

There is a painting guide for this miniature available here.

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I painted this miniature as a bit of post golden demon fun. As usual I wanted to try something a little different from the Eavy Metal scheme and went with purple and red as the main colours, with turquoise and ochre accents.

Overall I’m reasonably pleased with how it turned out. I put the most effort into the face and although I got a nice clean finish I probably should have considered how to get a bit more menace into her expression.

Before anyone asks, it’s extremely unlikely I’ll be painting the big Morathi in this lifetime!

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Nazgul of Dol Guldur

A painting guide for this miniature is available here.

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I was really pleased to see Forgeworld bringing out the Nazgul miniatures after what seemed like endless dwarf, orc and lake town nonsense from the terrible Hobbit movies! I think that technically the Nazgul are from the Hobbit too but they’re also in the Lord of the Rings so that’s good enough for me!

It was a challenge to try and think of something interesting to do with this miniature since it’s very much just steel with a black cloak! I’ve added some subtle texture to the cloak and tried to make the non metallic metal a little interesting by highlighting it with cold green and including some reflections from a far off fire, which could be the fires of mount doom or just a camp fire made by some foolish hobbits! In reality the highlights are a bit greener than they appear in these pictures, but I really struggled to get an accurate colour balance on this miniature for some reason.

I was surprised to find that the Nazgul have been sculpted by hand, as I thought pretty much everything had been switched over to digital by now. I think CAD would have been a better choice with so much armour on the miniature – some of the surfaces were not as smooth or as precise as I would have liked and did have to spend some time with sandpaper and putty just correcting various areas. I’m pleased to say that the casting was pretty good though! The Nazgul are also larger than I expected – this guy towers over the other Lord of the Rings miniatures that I’ve got lying around. I’m not sure if this was intentional or just a bit of scale creep.

I’ll enter this into golden demon in a couple of weeks but without any great hope of winning anything, as I don’t think it’s the best choice of miniature for a competition piece. Still, after taking gold in this category in 2016 and 2017 I don’t think I can complain too much!

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Captain-General Trajann Valoris

There is a full step by step painting guide for this miniature available here.

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With Golden Demon looming on the horizon it was high time to turn my attention to this year’s entry for 40k single miniature, in a (probably doomed) attempt to defend the gold I got last year with my terminator librarian.

With some trepidation I elected to paint Captain-General Trajann Valoris of the Adeptus Custodes. It’s a fantastic looking miniature, but this guy is big (he’s supplied with a 40mm base, which seems woefully inadequate if you ask me) and he is absolutely festooned with detail so I knew I was in for the very long haul again!

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As is often the case, I wanted to do something different to the ‘Eavy Metal paintjob and decided to find out what he would look like in the white armour of the Solar Watch. I’ve been wanting to revisit white armour since I painted the primaris lieutenant last year, as it is quite the challenge to get it looking good and I learnt some things from that piece that I thought could help me here. Once again I’ve used the excellent Warcolours blue grey set to paint the armour.

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A few thoughts on the miniature:

  • Fantastic sculpt (Matt Holland). Nothing much to criticise in my opinion! The only thing I would say is that viewed from the side he seems a little flat and 2-dimensional, like an old metal miniature. Maybe it would look more interesting with the cloak billowing out a bit, but then again it wouldn’t appear to have so much weight and gravitas if it did that.
  • This was the first single mini I’ve purchased that came in a box and what I was really impressed with was the fact that the two sprues were held apart from each other so none of the fine detail could get damaged in transit. Big improvement!
  • As with so many citadel miniatures these days, painting this guy is sub assembly hell. But there is an extra challenge because when you can finally put the cloak on, it comes in several pieces and there is a very obvious yet difficult to access join line right around where the handle of his dagger is. Getting rid of that was tricky!

Overall I’m pretty pleased with how the piece has turned out and I think it’s a fairly unique interpretation of the miniature. I think I need to paint something a little less challenging next though!

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