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Geigor Fell-Hand

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This was a fun little project that I painted as a gift for a friend.

Sculpted by Darren Latham for the Burning of Prospero box, Geigor Fell-Hand is my first ever Space Wolf (only taken me 24 years to get round to it!). Loads of cool details on this: wolf pelts, armour trim, plenty of weapons, gems… I particularly enjoyed painting the face for some reason – I don’t recall ever painting a mini with sculpted eyebrows before, but it was great!

I aimed for a fairly ‘Eavy Metal style with true metallics and lots of edge highlighting. I believe that technically heresy era Space Wolves are supposed to have a neutral grey armour but I wanted to paint it closer to the 40k scheme, so I ended up with a kind of halfway house with a bluish grey. I took inspiration from an old ‘Eavy Metal masterclass by Neil Green and went with red hair and yellow trim rather than the blond and red from the box art.

I added some damage to armour in the places where it was most likely to occur: more on the front than the back and plenty around the lightning claw and the bottom of the boots. Not many opportunities for freehand on this mini, but I was at least able to paint his name onto the claw!

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Blood Angels Terminator Librarian

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The librarian is now finished! Since the last update I painted the axe, went back and touched up the armour (particularly some of the transitions on the red shoulder pads that I wasn’t happy with), painted the gems and spent a little more time working on his face. Oh, and the base. 😉

For the force axe I base coated with black and then applied area highlights in two stages using a mix of turquoise and white (about 1:1 and then with more white added). I then painted on the lightning using a brush with a good point and applied some glazes here and there until it looked right. Unusually for me I didn’t use the maximum colour saturation (unmixed turquoise) at any point. The miniature is already pretty colourful and I didn’t want to overdo it.

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I’ve glazed some more purple and blue tones into the shadows on the face, as I wanted to convey that this guy isn’t super healthy and the psychic ability is taking a toll on him. I’ve painted some veins around the temples to emphasise this too. For some reason I’ve struggled to get the mouth looking right on this miniature – in the end this was the best I could do!

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I thought long and hard about adding some damage to the armour. Having spent the time getting to a point of shiny perfection I find it very difficult to then do something that will detract from this, and I’ve bottled out of doing it in the past. On this occasion I came to the conclusion that damaged armour would suit the somewhat stressed-looking face better than a factory fresh suit, so I took a deep breath and plunged in! Here’s a picture of how he looked before:

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I’m happy with my decision and it was good to push myself out of my comfort zone. That’s two new things on this piece, since I had never attempted textured freehand before either. 🙂

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I built the base out of ureol modelling board, plasticard and a couple of brass etch pieces from forgeworld. It’s quite simple, but that is very much my style – I’m still having headaches over the high elf sea base at the moment too, and I couldn’t handle having two difficult basing projects on my plate!

Overall I very much enjoyed this project. It’s a great sculpt by Ed Cottrell for the best space marines chapter 😉 and hopefully I’ve done it justice!

You can find earlier work in progress here:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

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Griff Oberwald

The recent re-release of Blood Bowl had me digging through my big pile o’ boxes to find my antique copy of this classic game and convince myself that I really didn’t need to succumb to new shiny syndrome and buy a copy of the new version!

I have the old school plastic human and orc teams (badly) painted so I was able to crack them out and have a couple of games with my wife. It was great fun but it occurred to me that it would potentially be even more fun to introduce some star players. More digging ensued and I discovered my 22 year old Griff Oberwald. Apparently at some point in the past I had painted him black and red and then decided to strip this off because he was in a very sad state! Clearly I couldn’t let this legend of the Blood Bowl field languish like this so I decided to bring him out of retirement.

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Painting this miniature reminded me just how lucky we are these days – the cast was definitely a lot rougher than my rose tinted spectacles had led me to believe! Consequently I wanted to strike a balance and make him look decent without spending too long over something that’s never going to be perfect. Total time here was about 15 hours which I think is fairly reasonable considering there’s a bit of freehand work.

I used this opportunity to test the scale 75 flesh paint set that I acquired a while ago. My overall impression was favourable although I think it would be good to try these paints out on a larger area of flesh. I knew that they needed a lot of shaking before I bought the set but I did find this aspect of using them very tedious, and it definitely slowed me down a bit! Nice range of colours though.

I also shaded the gold using the gloss version of reikland fleshshade. I like the way that it doesn’t dull the metallic paint but I found that it lacked a bit of contrast so I still ended up revisiting most of the recesses with paint. It’s useful, but definitely not a magic bullet.

Hopefully Griff will be taking to the field soon, although my wife will probably use him so I may end up regretting this little project!

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Storm of Sigmar: Blood Warriors

I have finished painting the contents of the Storm of Sigmar box! Granted, not particularly well, but it is satisfying to have completed a small project like this. I hope to get a couple of trial games in over the next few weeks. And now I know that I can get stuff painted to a reasonable standard while sitting on the sofa of an evening it opens up all sorts of exciting possibilities…

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I stuck to the same colours I used for the blood reavers, although obviously there’s far less flesh on display with these guys. I love the dynamism of the running guy, although the one with the beard is a great sculpt too. Not so keen on the tooth axe and the gaping maw of the bloke in the middle.

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Here’s a shot of everything in the Storm of Sigmar box. 13 miniatures completed! I can give myself a pat on the back and have a celebratory mince pie. 😉

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Storm of Sigmar: Retributors

Just a quick update as I have now completed the Stormcast from the Storm of Sigmar box with this handsome pair of Paladin Retributors!

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As with the liberators, these were mostly painted on the sofa after work, with the intention of achieving a decent tabletop standard. These are very nice models, although personally I’m not a massive fan of the backpacks. Maybe there’s some explanation for them in the background that I’m unaware of.

Here’s the obligatory group shot:

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If I paint any more of these I’m going to need a bigger photography backdrop! Just as well I have to turn to the Khorne side of the box now. Still mulling over the colour scheme for those guys…

 

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Storm of Sigmar: Liberators

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The curse of being a perfectionist is that it’s really difficult to back off a bit and be happy with a lower standard of painting. Consequently I don’t suppose that I’ll ever own an army for any game system, but I do like the thought of having some smaller forces for playing the odd skirmish sized game.

My main focus in this direction at the moment is my 15 mm miniatures, but I started wondering recently whether I could also do a bit of painting while sitting on the sofa of an evening. The poor lighting and lack of a firm surface means that it’s impossible to do any kind of high end painting, so this is a good opportunity for me to force myself to just paint at a tabletop standard.

I love the Age of Sigmar range but I haven’t had much opportunity to paint any of the miniatures thus far. So for this project I decided to pick up a copy of the Storm of Sigmar box. This contains 5 Stormcast Eternals and 8 Khorne dudes. Surely even I can get through such a paltry amount of miniatures?

(Incidently, the Storm of Sigmar box is brilliant in my opinion. 13 really superb minis, a rule book, cards, dice and transfers for £20. And the book has a decent number of scenarios to play games with the contents of the box. Really good value!)

So far I’ve managed to paint the 3 liberators. I decided to use the same colour scheme that I used on the Knight-Questor from the Silver Tower box, but I exchanged the magenta that I had used on the plume and the weapon grips for a warm purple, using liche purple with warlock purple highlights. I prefer the way this looks, so I went back and repainted those bits on the Knight-Questor. Here he is with his chums:

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I think the paint jobs look fine from a distance. I won’t be posting any close ups though!

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Knight-Questor

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I’ve not given up on painting at least the heroes from the silver tower, although I can’t really afford to spend a lot of time on them. 😦

Painting this guy was made more difficult because he was fully assembled – I’d definitely leave the shield off if I was painting this for competition!

I tried out the new citadel gold metallic and the gloss shade – overall very impressed with these! I think the deepest recesses need to be made a little darker with paint rather than relying on the shade, but I do like the way it doesn’t dull the shine.

I was going for a fairly ‘eavy metal style on this piece. It’s funny, but the more I paint miniatures, the more I appreciate this approach since it looks good in all light conditions. And I think achieving a good result is more difficult than a lot of people think.

From now on I’m going to try and note down colours that I’ve used in these posts. Partly to aid my ailing memory and partly because I often get asked what colours I’ve used and it seems sensible to me to just write it once!

Main colours used on this piece were as follows:

Armour

Basecoat: VMC deck tan (pallid wych flesh is a close match for this).

Shade: 1:1 rakarth flesh/cloudy grey (reaper) and add some black. The deepest recesses end up being a fairly dark grey.

Highlight: white.

Purple trim

Basecoat: naggaroth night

Shade: VGA Imperial blue and black

Highlight: VMC violet, genestealer purple, add white

Gold

Basecoat: retributor armour

Shade: reikland flesh (gloss), dark flesh/black mix for deepest recesses

Highlight: liberator gold, mithril silver

Plume and sword handle

Basecoat: 2:1 warlock purple: wazdakka red

Shade: liche purple, add black

Highlight: add white to basecoat

Glaze with wazdakka

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Mantic elf (and cat)

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The colour scheme will doubtless seem somewhat familiar to anyone that has seen my recent Dragon Maiden, but I painted this many moons ago and it never saw the light of day.

I think at one time there was talk of an online painting competition alongside one of Mantic’s open days so I painted up this elf and his pet cat from the copy of Dwarf Kings Hold: Green Menace that I’ve got lying around.

If the competition ever happened I never saw it, but it seemed a shame never to share this so here it is. 🙂

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Legolas Greenleaf

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I’m very fond of GW’s Lord of the Rings range. The films made a big impression on me and the sculpts (I think they’re mostly the work of the Perry twins) really capture the mood and the aesthetic. Result: a very inspired and motivated painter!

I’m much less keen on the Hobbit however. I read the book as a kid and didn’t particularly like it, and predictably the films weren’t a patch on the LotR trilogy. So I was less enthusiastic about the minis to begin with (even though there are still some lovely sculpts), and it wasn’t helped by them coinciding with the finecast era! Fortunately there are a few plastics available, so when I was looking for something to paint up as a result of a late decision to go to Warhammer Fest I decided to give Legolas a go.

I’ll hold my hands up here and say that I was so keen to get painting that I didn’t really think much about colours. I had a vague idea that I wanted his robe to be dark red and fancied doing the armour in gold, but beyond that nothing was planned. This is a bad habit of mine that I’m trying to correct with future projects.

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When painting LotR/Hobbit minis for competition the challenge is to do something to make yours stand out. Compared to the Warhammer ranges the minis are very small and have a lovely simplicity about them. I’ve had good results in the past with subtle little freehands and texturing and I decided to employ both here. (In case you’re wondering, the freehand on this piece are the little patterns I painted on the daggers – I told you they were subtle.)

I spent some time with a couple of reference pictures of Orlando Bloom trying to place the highlights and shades to capture the likeness. I don’t think I was wholly successful in this – but the face really is tiny so I was probably being a bit ambitious.

I went for NMM on this piece as I find metallics don’t have much impact when the details are so small.

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One of the things I like about this scale is that the minis are small enough that I can indulge the inner perfectionist and make every blend as smooth as possible without it resulting in hundreds of hours of work. I think Legolas ended up being as close to flawless as anything I’ve achieved so far, and I was very pleased to take gold at Golden Demon.

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Mistweaver Saih

AoS compI had every intention of resisting the temptation to pick up the Silver Tower when it was announced, since I knew there was no chance I’d ever paint 50-odd miniatures. But I got the chance to see the minis up close at Warhammer Fest and I liked what I saw of the gameplay, and thus my fate was sealed.

I didn’t have to think too hard before deciding to paint the Mistweaver. Although the Age of Sigmar releases thus far have been pretty amazing, tragically there has been a distinct lack of elves. The Mistweaver is nothing like the classic Warhammer elves that I know and love, but it’s a very dynamic sculpt and has some interesting details that looked like fun to paint. Mistweaver2mistweaver3mistweaver4I deliberately spent more time than usual planning the colours on this piece, as I wanted to do something different to the studio colour scheme but not get halfway through the piece and realise that it wasn’t working. I was given a handy tip by the ‘Eavy Metal guys and tested colours using the greyscale image from the assembly guide before committing to the miniature. I had thought about trying to blend the mist into the clothing but the sculpted transition is quite stark and I wasn’t confident I’d be able to disguise it well with paint.

I wanted a base that would match the tiles from the Silver Tower so I used some textured plasticard and added a suitable Tzeentch shape on top. As the piece was going to be entered into an online painting competition on the Age of Sigmar facebook page I added a totally unnecessary freehand onto the robe in an effort to wow the judges.

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I gave the Mistweaver to sculptor David Waeselynck at the recent Golden Demon winners’ day up at Warhammer World and he seemed quite pleased. (No idea what the Star Wars reference is about mind you…)

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